Artist
Héctor Zamora
See images of Work
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Memorándum
Digital print
210 x 143 x 5 cm
2017

The constructive, visual and sound elements of Memorandum make reference to assembly plants, factories and workshops. They reveal the disadvantages of forming the least-valued link in the chain of machinery, hence the word used for the title, which means “what must be remembered.” Zamora provokes memory, in the institution, in this country, and as a witness to the present times.

Memorándum
Digital print
210 x 143 x 5 cm
2017

The constructive, visual and sound elements of Memorandum make reference to assembly plants, factories and workshops. They reveal the disadvantages of forming the least-valued link in the chain of machinery, hence the word used for the title, which means “what must be remembered.” Zamora provokes memory, in the institution, in this country, and as a witness to the present times.

Ruptura
Digital print
210 x 143 x 5 cm
2016

150 people dressed in black lean on the banister of the Centro Cultural Banco do Brasil in absolute silence. They carry a book, also black, from which they start tearing off pages one by one, to then let them fall into the free space. The sound of the pages being torn invades the hall. Later on, the books, with their pages carelessly recovered and put back into them, are left on a table, as if waiting for something to happen, while the sound of the “rupture” lingers in the free space as an almost tangible vivid memory. The performance/sound piece idealized by Zamora for the CCBB remains programmatically open, without leading to only one way of interpreting it. On one hand, it summarizes in clear way the Zeitgeist, the spirit of our times, as it generates an intangible and elusive sensation of dissatisfaction and oppression akin to what many of us feel while reflecting upon the world we live in. On the other, the rupture carries a utopic message of catharsis and liberation. The bravery needed to tear off the pages is the one that can save us. Through these ripped books, the artist seems to say that we will be able to start again, or, paraphrasing T.S. Eliot: these fragments we will shore against our ruins.

Ruptura
Digital print
210 x 143 x 5 cm
2016

150 people dressed in black lean on the banister of the Centro Cultural Banco do Brasil in absolute silence. They carry a book, also black, from which they start tearing off pages one by one, to then let them fall into the free space. The sound of the pages being torn invades the hall. Later on, the books, with their pages carelessly recovered and put back into them, are left on a table, as if waiting for something to happen, while the sound of the “rupture” lingers in the free space as an almost tangible vivid memory. The performance/sound piece idealized by Zamora for the CCBB remains programmatically open, without leading to only one way of interpreting it. On one hand, it summarizes in clear way the Zeitgeist, the spirit of our times, as it generates an intangible and elusive sensation of dissatisfaction and oppression akin to what many of us feel while reflecting upon the world we live in. On the other, the rupture carries a utopic message of catharsis and liberation. The bravery needed to tear off the pages is the one that can save us. Through these ripped books, the artist seems to say that we will be able to start again, or, paraphrasing T.S. Eliot: these fragments we will shore against our ruins.

Ordre et Progrès
Digital print
143 x 210 x 5 cm
2016

Protogeometries, Essay on the anexact
Installation view
2013

From a tense clothesline hang the family sheets as they sway with the wind’s come and go. On their white tissue dance the shadows of geometric shapes. Circles within large square and small triangles move in their arabesque progression to the rhythm of the urban breeze. This sunny zotehuela surrounded by latticework, a space typical of social housing in newly urbanized Mexico during the 70s, is the memory that for Héctor Zamora (Mexico City, 1974) became a body of work based on the observation and tracking of its basic architectural elements.

The advent of social housing projects in Mexico is historically expressed through paradigmatic examples such as the Multifamiliar Alemán (1948), or the Conjunto Urbano Tlatelolco (1949), both designed by Mario Pani in close concordance with the ideas that Le Corbusier applied in the Cité Radieuse.

For Zamora, witness of the transformations of the modern in México, the latticework rises beyond reminiscence as a formal, distinctive element, traditional in origin but characteristic of an era in which architectural practice was linked to improvement in quality of life. Whether in countries under post-revolutionary construction, such as Mexico; in the process of post-war reconstruction, such as France; or in the way of reinvention, as in Brazil, architecture responded internationally to the alleged needs of the future.

This architecture, half a century after being projected by individuals, transformed, transferred and mutated following the identity of the people who inhabit it. From India to Istanbul, São Paulo to México City, Héctor Zamora recognized in units such as lattice the symptoms of the unstoppable march of the present.

The title of the exhibition refers to a dual space of possibility in which the test function of the essay, as complement of the theoretical studies, enriches itself by the nuances introduced by Deleuze with the concept ‘anexact’ to the classical dichotomy —bound to the modern architectural tradition according to Reiser+Umamoto— of the exact-inexact. The anexact as a space of rigorous experimentation is thus established as the axis of the artist’s praxis and philosophy.

It is within this framework that Zamora developed a series of explorations of hardened mud brick lattice. In works like 6 from the Potencialities series and ViBo the basic element is deconstructed to function beyond its utilitarian usage and therefore uncover its semantic possibilities. The ancestral construction cell, geometric yet imperfect, unfolds into 63 new pieces that are rhythmically arranged onto the gallery wall. This new configuration of its form and physical presence is built in the — anexact— space between the formality of the grid and haphazard freedom, the discipline and anarchy, the domination and emancipation.

Torre C3 (Celosía clave 3)
Cement, sand, wire rod, wire, lattice, sale tricycle
101 x 80 x 350 cm
2013

From a tense clothesline hang the family sheets as they sway with the wind’s come and go. On their white tissue dance the shadows of geometric shapes. Circles within large square and small triangles move in their arabesque progression to the rhythm of the urban breeze. This sunny zotehuela surrounded by latticework, a space typical of social housing in newly urbanized Mexico during the 70s, is the memory that for Héctor Zamora (Mexico City, 1974) became a body of work based on the observation and tracking of its basic architectural elements.

The advent of social housing projects in Mexico is historically expressed through paradigmatic examples such as the Multifamiliar Alemán (1948), or the Conjunto Urbano Tlatelolco (1949), both designed by Mario Pani in close concordance with the ideas that Le Corbusier applied in the Cité Radieuse.

For Zamora, witness of the transformations of the modern in México, the latticework rises beyond reminiscence as a formal, distinctive element, traditional in origin but characteristic of an era in which architectural practice was linked to improvement in quality of life. Whether in countries under post-revolutionary construction, such as Mexico; in the process of post-war reconstruction, such as France; or in the way of reinvention, as in Brazil, architecture responded internationally to the alleged needs of the future.

This architecture, half a century after being projected by individuals, transformed, transferred and mutated following the identity of the people who inhabit it. From India to Istanbul, São Paulo to México City, Héctor Zamora recognized in units such as lattice the symptoms of the unstoppable march of the present.

The title of the exhibition refers to a dual space of possibility in which the test function of the essay, as complement of the theoretical studies, enriches itself by the nuances introduced by Deleuze with the concept ‘anexact’ to the classical dichotomy —bound to the modern architectural tradition according to Reiser+Umamoto— of the exact-inexact. The anexact as a space of rigorous experimentation is thus established as the axis of the artist’s praxis and philosophy.

It is within this framework that Zamora developed a series of explorations of hardened mud brick lattice. In works like 6 from the Potencialities series and ViBo the basic element is deconstructed to function beyond its utilitarian usage and therefore uncover its semantic possibilities. The ancestral construction cell, geometric yet imperfect, unfolds into 63 new pieces that are rhythmically arranged onto the gallery wall. This new configuration of its form and physical presence is built in the — anexact— space between the formality of the grid and haphazard freedom, the discipline and anarchy, the domination and emancipation.

Praia Recanto das Crianças
Photos, video, mockup, polaroids and sketches.
Dimensions variable
2006

Praia recanto das crianças, Sao Vicente, SP, Brazil.

In the instinct of a game lies the most pure state of liberty and fullness

Recanto das criaças beach, São Vicente, São Paulo, Brazil.

Detonate a game-party on the beach where people may use rubber rings taken from tires to float and enjoy together building a floating structure. Its shape will be determined by the participants and it will be influenced by the stream and tides of the sea.

Geometrias Danhinas
PVC pipes and water lilies
2006

“Harmful geometries” is an intervention at the Ibirapuera lake based on the 2220 square meters of water hyacinth contained by 51 octagonal structures of pvc pipes. The authorization to place the water hyacinths was cancelled on September 25th, 2006. The octagonal structures are still floating on the lake.

Topografía volátil
Balloons, wire and helium
300 x 450 x 1000 cm
2006

Created to be passed through, the objective of this work is to encourage a dialogue between the spectator, organic form and geometry. This experience, detached from the implications of structural formalism, detonates an individual dialogue with space and stimulates poetic perception.

Volatile Topography is the latest of Zamora’s approach to funicular geometry as a tool to redefine urban space—in this case over the Oncheoncheon River Canal. His intervention consists of mesh of intersecting ropes defying gravity and flowing in the air thanks to helium balloons attached to each node. Furthermore, the volatile space, slightly modified by the wind, will create nimble variations, pleats and deformations on the mesh.

Highly elaborate, precise and touching, this installation will result in a three-dimensional drawing transformed into passable landscape.

Topografía volátil
Balloons, wire and helium
300 x 450 x 1000 cm
2006

Created to be passed through, the objective of this work is to encourage a dialogue between the spectator, organic form and geometry. This experience, detached from the implications of structural formalism, detonates an individual dialogue with space and stimulates poetic perception.

Volatile Topography is the latest of Zamora’s approach to funicular geometry as a tool to redefine urban space—in this case over the Oncheoncheon River Canal. His intervention consists of mesh of intersecting ropes defying gravity and flowing in the air thanks to helium balloons attached to each node. Furthermore, the volatile space, slightly modified by the wind, will create nimble variations, pleats and deformations on the mesh.

Highly elaborate, precise and touching, this installation will result in a three-dimensional drawing transformed into passable landscape.

Paracaidista (Squatter) Av. Revolución 1608 bis
Intervention
Steel, wood, asphalt
74 m2
2004

Experimental construction of art carrillo gils´s façade. For its execution, self-construction techniques were used. They were researched in the processes of urban population of the suburbs of mexico city and combined with a structural system that allowed it to be suspended from the top of the bulding (it was not possible for it to be fixes to the external walls of the museum). The work uses organic strategies in order to create a symbiotic, epiphyte and/ or parasite relationship with the building, the city, the institutions and/or the people. By taking possession of the public space, a new independent and autonomus address has been created – 1608 bis (bis is used in mexico when there are two addresses in same number) – wich was inhabited by the artist for 3 months. The word paracaidista, besides meaning parachutist, is the name given in mexico to people who occupy irregularly a piece of land.

Bio

Mexico City, Mexico, 1974.
Lives and works in Lisbon, Portugal.

Héctor Zamora's work transcends the conventional exhibition space, reinventing it, redefining it, generating friction between the common roles of public and private, exterior and interior, organic and geometric, savage and methodical, real and imaginary.

From his technical expertise and knowledge of lightweight architecture, and a meticulous emphasis on the process of conceptualization and construction of each piece, Zamora implicates the viewer's participation and requires them to question the everyday uses of materials and the functions of space.

"From the beginning I sought to take the works out of the spaces of the museums with the ambition of being able to establish a more open dialogue with a wider audience. In the end, museums are public spaces, but they are internal spaces. Being outside the museum, there is no barrier: any person is going to have an interaction with the works, and I think I force it in some way to that. In this way, you get reactions that often surprise more than you can find within the space of the museum. Obviously, this also comes from my concerns about social and political issues, " says Zamora.

Hector Zamora manages to subvert each one of his work sites and in some of his interventions he plays with the institutional structures, inserting himself in critical points where it is possible to find sufficient flexibility to generate a reaction. For example, building a parasitic house on the Carrillo Gil Museum in Mexico City (after five months of construction delay caused by bureaucratic procedures), dealing with the ban on putting two thousand meters of water lily in Sao Paulo, placing double mirrors to the windows of the Museum of Contemporary Art in San Diego, or driving a set of bricks with the citizens of Genk (Belgium) without the sanction of the local government.

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Exhibitions
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