Artist
Nicholas Mangan
See images of Work

A World Undone (Still 1)
Photographic print
40.5 x 69.5 cm
2012

A World Undone delves into Zircon, a 4,400 Million year old mineral that has been unearthed within some of the earth’s earliest crust in Western Australia’s extremely remote Jack Hills.

The project gathered a small sample of the geological material to be crushed and reduced to dust, disaggregating the very matter that it was comprised of. The dust was filmed, airborne, by a camera that captures movement at a speed of 2500 frames per second. The airborne dust elicits an image of the earth’s crust dematerializing, a rear vision view of the earth’s becoming; an inverted cosmos.

In the words of founding Geologist James Hutton, the so-called discoverer of deep-time; “No vestige of a beginning - no prospect of an end”.

A World Undone [Protolith]
Zircone, glass, metal, film on HD colour, silent, loop
150 x 90 x 3 cm
2012

A World Undone delves into Zircon, a 4,400 Million year old mineral that has been unearthed within some of the earth’s earliest crust in Western Australia’s extremely remote Jack Hills.

The project gathered a small sample of the geological material to be crushed and reduced to dust, disaggregating the very matter that it was comprised of. The dust was filmed, airborne, by a camera that captures movement at a speed of 2500 frames per second. The airborne dust elicits an image of the earth’s crust dematerializing, a rear vision view of the earth’s becoming; an inverted cosmos.

In the words of founding Geologist James Hutton, the so-called discoverer of deep-time; “No vestige of a beginning - no prospect of an end”.

Matter Over Mind
C Print in cotton paper
69 x 103 cm
2012

A World Undone delves into Zircon, a 4,400 Million year old mineral that has been unearthed within some of the earth’s earliest crust in Western Australia’s extremely remote Jack Hills.

The project gathered a small sample of the geological material to be crushed and reduced to dust, disaggregating the very matter that it was comprised of. The dust was filmed, airborne, by a camera that captures movement at a speed of 2500 frames per second. The airborne dust elicits an image of the earth’s crust dematerializing, a rear vision view of the earth’s becoming; an inverted cosmos.

In the words of founding Geologist James Hutton, the so-called discoverer of deep-time; “No vestige of a beginning - no prospect of an end”.

A1 Southwest Stone
C-print
90 x 90 cm
2008

The project involved the excavation of an existing Santa Fe garage/shed. A narrative was constructed around the existing hand painted signage on the building, which reads “A1 Southwest Stone”, (a former local business), imbuing the site with both archeological and forensic speculation, the narrative alluded to the possibility that the stone once sold from the A1 Southwest Stone premises was sourced from a plundered ancient pueblo ruin which laid beneath the present building.

Ancient Lights
Color HD, audio, loop
2015

Ancient Lights explores connections between the Aztec Sun Stone, rediscovered at Zócalo, Mexico City where it was buried following the Spanish Conquest; the concentric mirrors of the Gemasolar Thermosolar Plant in Southern Spain; and pioneering advances in dendrochronology carried out by A. E. Douglass at the Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research at the University of Arizona. In one film, Mangan brings together footage shot on location in Spain and Arizona with audiovisual data gathered by NASA’s Solar and Heliospheric Observatory project. This work positions the sun at the centre of a series of cyclic systems, both geophysical and cultural. Drawing on Aztec ritual and the research of Soviet scientist Alexander Chizhevsky, who linked sun spots and the eleven year solar cycle to periods of revolutionary activity, Mangan examines the relationship between entropy – as sacrifice or loss – and the perpetual movement of the sun.

Ancient Lights
Color HD, audio, loop
2015

Ancient Lights explores connections between the Aztec Sun Stone, rediscovered at Zócalo, Mexico City where it was buried following the Spanish Conquest; the concentric mirrors of the Gemasolar Thermosolar Plant in Southern Spain; and pioneering advances in dendrochronology carried out by A. E. Douglass at the Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research at the University of Arizona. In one film, Mangan brings together footage shot on location in Spain and Arizona with audiovisual data gathered by NASA’s Solar and Heliospheric Observatory project. This work positions the sun at the centre of a series of cyclic systems, both geophysical and cultural. Drawing on Aztec ritual and the research of Soviet scientist Alexander Chizhevsky, who linked sun spots and the eleven year solar cycle to periods of revolutionary activity, Mangan examines the relationship between entropy – as sacrifice or loss – and the perpetual movement of the sun.

Dowiyogo´s Ancient Coral Coffee Table
Coral Limestone from the island of Nauru
120 x 80 x 45 cm
2009

This project attempts to enter into the history of the island Republic of Nauru by completing a proposition but forward by the former president Bernhard Dowiyogo.
Lying on his death bed in a Washington D.C hospital in 2003, at the time of Nauru's imminent bankruptcy, Dowigyogo was quoted by an American reporter as saying that his plan to save Nauru’s ailing economy was to turn the remaining coral rock on the island into ancient coffee coral tables. These were to be sold on the US market. Dowiyogo passed away before his project could be realized.
The rock used in Dowiyogo’s Ancient Coral Coffee Table was sourced from Melbourne, Australia; the exact coral limestone pinnacles which had been shipped from Nauru during its 1970s hay-day. The pinnacles were installed in the forecourt of the high-rise Nauru House,
which the country had built with money made from the strip-mining and selling of their island’s nutrient rich interior to western interests. Agriculture - phosphate.
The pinnacles were erected as a symbol of prosperity, but in 2004 when Nauru House was sold to pay off the island’s national debt, they were torn from their podiums and removed from the site. By locating and purchasing a section of the pinnacles from the private owner who came to possess them, a homage to Dowiyogo’s project and the dying island itself was completed.

Talk About the Weather
Impresión Glicée
45 x 57.5 cm
2010

The Talk About the Weather works involved Mangan buying the “Australian newspaper” everyday for a year I rightwing leading/neoliberal mark, and collecting and reassembling particular images over the background of the stock market index, background noise or weather as I referred to it as.
Images were selected for their reference to actual events, or more general themes relating to the peak of Australia’s mining boom, also the oil spill of “deepwater horizon” in the gulf of Mexico in 2010, or a weather event like a hard freeze that froze crops of Oranges in florida in the same year.
The work as a whole deals with cycles of economics and weather, and it is an attempt to understand the micro and the macro of material in intangible transactions, flows and interruptions.

Talk About the Weather
Impresión Glicée
45 x 57.5 cm
2010

The Talk About the Weather works involved Mangan buying the “Australian newspaper” everyday for a year I rightwing leading/neoliberal mark, and collecting and reassembling particular images over the background of the stock market index, background noise or weather as I referred to it as.
Images were selected for their reference to actual events, or more general themes relating to the peak of Australia’s mining boom, also the oil spill of “deepwater horizon” in the gulf of Mexico in 2010, or a weather event like a hard freeze that froze crops of Oranges in florida in the same year.
The work as a whole deals with cycles of economics and weather, and it is an attempt to understand the micro and the macro of material in intangible transactions, flows and interruptions.

Bio

Geelong, Australia.
Currently lives and works in Melbourne, Australia.

For as long as the artist can remember, Nicholas Mangan has been pulling things apart – attempting to understand them – and then putting them back together (but not always in the same way). Mangan ́s practice is driven by the desire make sense of the world by unpacking histories and possible narratives that surround specific contested sites and objects. This investigation explores the unstable relationship between culture and nature, evidencing the flows of matter, energy and ideologies that are produced through the tension of these two realms. A disputed tropical mine, a bankrupted island nation, a geological sample of the earliest earth crust, discarded tourist souvenirs and the remnants of a demolished architectural icon have each lent material to this process of dissection and reconfiguration. By rerouting each of these stories, new forms and latent narratives are unearthed. Recent projects have utilized a confluence of film and sculpture as an agent for both formal and metaphorical excavation.

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